Boeing has celebrated the roll-out of the 1,000th 767, in a February 2 ceremony in which hundreds of current employees were joined by Boeing...

Boeing has celebrated the roll-out of the 1,000th 767, in a February 2 ceremony in which hundreds of current employees were joined by Boeing retirees who worked on the first 767.

The ceremony took place at the company’s widebody final-assembly plant in Everett, Washington.


“It was great to see so many people here today – the engineers, the technicians, the machinists – who have made the 767 the wonderful airplane it is,” said Jim Albaugh, president and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes, at the ceremony. “As we salute the 1,000th 767, the next 767 is already being built in a new bay where we can produce airplanes much more efficiently for years to come.”

Boeing celebrated the roll-out of the 1,000th 767 widebody – a 767-300ER for Japan's All Nippon Airways – with a ceremony on February 2, 2011 at the 767 final assembly line in Everett, Washington

The 1,000th 767 is a 767-300ER passenger aircraft for Japan’s All Nippon Airways and the aircraft was the final 767 to complete assembly on the current production line.

Final production work is now underway on the 1,001st 767 in a new, smaller bay which Boeing says will make the low-volume 767 assembly line a leaner, more efficient operation.

Boeing has offered the 767 as the platform for its NewGen Tanker if it wins the U.S. Air Force KC-X Tanker competition. A decision on the contract award is expected early this year.

Sized in the 200- to 300-seat market, the 767 family includes three passenger models – the 767-200ER, 767-300ER and 767-400ER – and a medium-widebody freighter, which is based on the 767-300ER fuselage.