Japan's All Nippon Airways, the launch customer for the Boeing 787, took delivery of its first 787-8 Dreamliner on September 25, 2011. Since then,...

Boeing is commemorating on September 25 the one-year anniversary of the first delivery of a Boeing 787 Dreamliner to a customer.

Japan’s All Nippon Airways (ANA), the launch customer for the Boeing 787, took delivery of its first 787-8 Dreamliner on September 25, 2011.


Since then, Boeing has delivered 25 Boeing 787-8 Dreamliners to six different customers. In chronological order of first delivery, these customers were ANA, Japan Airlines, Ethiopian Airlines, LAN Airlines, Air India and United Airlines.

ANA’s first Boeing 787, the first 787 delivered to a customer, landed at Tokyo Haneda Airport on September 27, 2011 following its delivery flight from Seattle

 

“One year ago today we reached a significant milestone in Boeing and ANA’s partnership,” says Ray Conner, president and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “We are grateful for the support and confidence that ANA has placed in Boeing as the launch customer of the 787 Dreamliner.”

“ANA has helped validate the airplane as truly game-changing,” adds Conner.  “All of our 787 customers have been an integral part of making the 787 a success. We are committed to each of them as they put the Dreamliner into service.”

Thousands of Boeing employees and dignitaries marked the historic delivery in a ceremony on September 26, 2011.

After the September 26, 2011 ceremony, ANA’s first 787 departed Paine Field in Everett, Washington – the location of Boeing’s first Boeing 787 final assembly line and of the assembly lines for all of the manufacturer’s other widebody aircraft types – and landed at Tokyo Haneda Airport on September 27, local time.

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is the first commercial jetliner made primarily of advanced composite materials.

According to Boeing, it offers exceptional passenger comfort features including cleaner air, a lower cabin altitude, higher humidity, bigger windows that dim electronically and more overhead storage space.