SAS is re-launching service on the Stockholm-Hamburg route on April 22. The airline will offer two round-trips on its Stockholm-Hamburg route every weekday and...

Scandinavian Airlines (SAS) is re-launching service on the Stockholm-Hamburg route on April 22.

Stockholm-Arlanda-based Scandinavian Airlines will offer two round-trips on its Stockholm-Hamburg route every weekday and one round-trip on Sundays.


Scandinavian Airlines is one of the few operators of the Boeing 737-600 and is possibly the largest operator of the type, with 27 in service in early 2014

Scandinavian Airlines is one of the few operators of the Boeing 737-600 and is possibly the largest operator of the type, with 27 in service in early 2014

 

SAS will operate the route with the Boeing 737-600 (which in SAS service seats 120 passengers) and the Boeing 717 (which seats 115 passengers).

The Boeing 717 flights are likely to be operated by Blue1, SAS Group’s Finnish subsidiary, which operates nine of the type: Scandinavian Airlines itself doesn’t operate the Boeing 717.

Flight time between Stockholm-Arlanda Airport and Hamburg Airport is 1 hour 30 minutes, according to Scandinavian Airlines.

Blue1, the Finnish subsidiary of SAS AB, operates nine Boeing 717s for the SAS network. This Blue1 Boeing 717 is taxiing from its gate at Helsinki-Vantaa Airport's Terminal 1 out towards the take-off runway

Blue1, the Finnish subsidiary of SAS AB, operates nine Boeing 717s for the SAS network. This Blue1 Boeing 717 is taxiing from its gate at Helsinki-Vantaa Airport’s Terminal 1 out towards the take-off runway

 

Hamburg is both an attractive business destination and a popular weekend destination for Swedes. Today, more than 100,000 passengers fly between Stockholm-Arlanda and Hamburg every year.

A vast inland port on the River Elbe, with some of its many harbors capable of handling the largest container ships in the world, Hamburg is also Germany’s second-largest city after Berlin.

SAS last operated the Stockholm-Hamburg route in 2009, but is now re-launching the route in order to meet SAS passengers’ needs for direct routes within Europe.

The Boeing 737-600, roughly comparable in size to the earlier 737-500, is the smallest and by far the lowest-selling version of the Boeing 737NG family. Only a handful of operators (including Scandinavian Airlines and WestJet) ordered the type and it remains the only 737NG model for which blended winglets have not been developed. This is one of SAS' 27 Boeing 737-600s

The Boeing 737-600, roughly comparable in size to the earlier 737-500, is the smallest and by far the lowest-selling version of the Boeing 737NG family. Only a handful of operators (including Scandinavian Airlines and WestJet) ordered the type and it remains the only 737NG model for which blended winglets have not been developed. This is one of SAS’ 27 Boeing 737-600s

 

“This is a much-requested route among SAS passengers and Northern Germany is a key business area for many Swedish companies,” says Joakim Landholm, head of commercial at SAS. “With a good business timetable, along with fast track and lounge, we have a strong offering and we are hopeful that this venture will turn out very well.”

Germany is a large market for Scandinavian Airlines and the airline has several daily direct departures from Stockholm-Arlanda to the three German destinations of Frankfurt, Düsseldorf and Berlin. In total, SAS operates around 500 flights a week between Scandinavia and Germany.

In 2014, SAS is launching more than 40 new European routes from Sweden, Norway and Denmark, in order to improve its customer offering with additional direct services to in-demand destinations.

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