American Airlines is launching daily service between Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and Beijing Capital International Airport on May 7.

American Airlines is launching daily service between Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and Beijing Capital International Airport on May 7.

According to American Airlines, the new service will represent its sixth daily flight to Asia from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (IATA code DFW) and will be the only non-stop flight connecting DFW and Beijing.


This is a computer graphic image of a Boeing 777-200ER in American Airlines' new livery. American operates 47 Boeing 777-200ERs and has a total of 20 Boeing 777-200ERs in service and on order

This is a computer graphic image of a Boeing 777-200ER in American Airlines’ new livery. American operates 47 Boeing 777-200ERs and has a total of 20 Boeing 777-200ERs in service and on order

 

Beijing will become the fifth Asian destination American serves with non-stop flights from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. The others are Hong Kong, Seoul, Shanghai and Tokyo, American operating daily flights from DFW to both of Tokyo’s major airports, Haneda and Narita.

With the addition of its new DFW-Beijing service, oneworld-alliance member American will offer 11 routes between the U.S. and Asia. Customers may book flights on the new route from Saturday, January 24.

“This new route gives our customers direct access between these two key business markets for the first time and will also provide customers hundreds of connecting opportunities to destinations worldwide,” says Andrew Nocella, American’s chief marketing officer.

American Airlines operates many of its long-haul services with Boeing 777-200ERs. The airline had 47 in service as of December 2012

American Airlines operates many of its long-haul services with Boeing 777-200ERs. The airline had 47 in service as of January 2015

 

Through American’s network from Dallas/Fort Worth, customers traveling from Beijing will have one-stop access to nearly 200 additional destinations throughout North, Central and South America. American says it offers more service to Latin America than any other U.S. airline.

American’s schedule on its Dallas/Fort Worth-Beijing service will see flight AA 89 depart DFW at 10:40 a.m. daily from May 7 and land at Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK) at 2:15 p.m. the following day, local time, after crossing the International Dateline.

In the other direction, flight AA88 will leave PEK at 4:25 p.m. daily from May 8 and touch down at DFW at 5:00 p.m. the same day, local time, again after crossing the International Dateline.

American will operate its service between DFW and Beijing with Boeing 777-200ER widebodies. The airline is retrofitting all of its 47 777-200ERs to refresh their cabins and enhance the premium-cabin experience on international flights.

Until American Airlines starts taking delivery of many of the Boeing 787s which it has ordered, the Boeing 777-200ER and 777-300ER are the carrier's primary long-haul aircraft types. American operates 47 777-200ERs, each of which it has outfitted to seat 247 passengers in three service classes

Until American Airlines takes delivery of many of the Boeing 787-8 and 787-9s which it has ordered, the Boeing 777-200ER and 777-300ER are the carrier’s primary long-haul aircraft types. American operates 47 777-200ERs, each of which it has outfitted to seat 247 passengers in three service classes

 

Each of the airline’s retrofitted 777-200ERs will have a Business Class cabin in which each seat reclines into a fully lie-flat bed and each seat has direct aisle access. The interior of each 777-200ER Business Class cabin will have a walk-up bar, unique lighting, an entry archway and a spacious look.

All of American’s 777-200ERs will also have Main Cabin Extra premium-economy seating and all Main Cabin seats will have in-seat in-flight entertainment systems.

Its new Beijing flight from DFW will complement American’s existing service from Chicago O’Hare International Airport to Beijing.

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