South African carrier Comair Limited has announced it placed an order in December for eight Boeing 737 MAX 8s, which the manufacturer values at...

South African carrier Comair Limited has announced it placed an order in December for eight Boeing 737 MAX 8s, which the manufacturer values at $830 million at list prices.

It is the first Boeing 737 MAX order announcement for an African operator. The manufacturer booked Comair’s order in December 2013 and on the Boeing Orders & Deliveries website has attributed it until now to an unidentified customer.


South Africa's Comair Limited announced on March 19, 2014 that it had ordered eight Boeing 737 MAX 8s in December 2013. This was the first 737 MAX order announcement by an African operator. Johannesburg-based Comair operates Africa’s first low-cost carrier, kulula.com, and is also a franchise partner of British Airways, operating its local and regional Southern African routes. This Boeing computer graphic image shows 737 MAX 8s in the kulula.com and British Airways (operated by Comair) liveries

South Africa’s Comair Limited announced on March 19, 2014 that it had ordered eight Boeing 737 MAX 8s in December 2013. This was the first 737 MAX order announcement by an African operator. Johannesburg-based Comair operates Africa’s first low-cost carrier, kulula.com, and is also a franchise partner of British Airways, operating its local and regional Southern African routes. This Boeing computer graphic image shows 737 MAX 8s in the kulula.com and British Airways (operated by Comair) liveries

 

“We’re proud to be the first African operator to announce an order the 737 MAX,” says Erik Venter, chief executive officer of Comair. “This investment in Comair’s fleet upgrade is fundamental to its business strategy of consistently improving customer service and value, while ensuring a sustainable airline.

Adds Venter: “Our decision to make this investment was not taken lightly and is a critical component in managing our exposure to the volatile fuel price and thus minimizing the impact of the fuel price on airfares.”

Johannesburg-based Comair operates Africa’s first low-cost carrier, kulula.com, offering flights between South Africa’s major cities.

Comair Limited is also a franchise partner of British Airways, operating its local and regional Southern African routes. The company currently flies an all-Boeing fleet of 25 Classic and Next-Generation 737s on its kulula.com and British Airways (operated by Comair) brands.

Compared to today’s wingtip technology, which provides up to a 4 per cent fuel-burn advantage at long ranges, Boeing's Advanced Technology winglet will provide a total fuel-burn improvement of up to 5.5 per cent on the same long routes, according to the manufacturer. Pictured here is an artist’s rendering of a 737 MAX 9 with new Advanced Technology winglets. The 737 MAX rendering is updated to reflect design decisions made since the launch of the program in August 2011. Note the lower-fuselage fairing near the nose to accommodate the longer nosewheel leg of the 737 MAX, compared with today's 737s

Compared to today’s wingtip technology, which provides up to a 4 per cent fuel-burn advantage at long ranges, Boeing’s Advanced Technology winglet will provide a total fuel-burn improvement of up to 5.5 per cent on the same long routes, according to the manufacturer. Pictured here is an artist’s rendering of a 737 MAX 9 with new Advanced Technology winglets. The 737 MAX rendering is updated to reflect design decisions made since the launch of the program in August 2011

 

The company’s order for eight Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets will support Comair’s future fleet renewal and expansion, according to Boeing.

Including its March 19 order announcement, Comair has a total of 12 aircraft on order from Boeing: the eight 737 MAX 8s and four Boeing 737-800 aircraft for delivery in 2015 and 2016.

Since Boeing launched the 737 MAX program in 2011, the 737 MAX family has amassed orders for more than 1,800 aircraft from customers throughout the world.