Bombardier Aerospace has completed the first full powering-on of the main electrical distribution system on the first CSeries flight-test aircraft. Additionally, Bombardier says the...

Bombardier Aerospace has completed the first full powering-on of the main electrical distribution system on the first CSeries flight-test aircraft, which the manufacturer has labeled ‘FTV1’.

Additionally, Bombardier says it has successfully concluded the wing down-bending static test on the Complete Airframe Static Test (CAST) airframe for the Bombardier CSeries family. The CAST static-test airframe is located at the company’s Saint-Laurent, Québec facility.


Together with the wing up-bending static test that Bombardier Aerospace completed earlier in March, the two most significant wing static tests required for first flight are now complete, the manufacturer says.

Bombardier Aerospace completed powering-on the main electrical distribution system on the first CSeries flight-test aircraft by March 25, 2013. This photograph shows the first flight-test CS100 outside the assembly facility in late March 2013 before installation of its wing-body join fairings and before being painted

Bombardier Aerospace completed powering-on the main electrical distribution system on the first CSeries flight-test aircraft by March 25, 2013. This photograph shows the first flight-test CS100 outside the assembly facility in late March 2013 before installation of its wing-body join fairings and before being painted

 

According to Bombardier Aerospace, safety-of-flight tests are progressing well on “Aircraft 0” – the on-the-ground integrated systems test rig (ISTCR) for the CSeries.

“The powering on of the main electrical distribution system on FTV1 was one of the most exciting milestones so far in the CSeries aircraft development program and will now allow powering of all sub-systems and for the avionics suite testing,” says Rob Dewar, vice president and general manager, CSeries for Bombardier Commercial Aircraft.

“As well, the last significant test on the CAST article − the down-bending test on the wing − was completed in late March, and we are thrilled with the analysis and feedback from the team, which allows progression to the next experimental phase,” says Dewar. “These are all important activities that will lead to the CSeries aircraft’s safety-of-flight permit.”

Adds Dewar: “The build of the flight test vehicles, the static airframe testing and the systems tests are all advancing to schedule. We are very satisfied with the CSeries aircraft’s excellent progress and weekly achievements as we advance solidly towards first flight.”

Designed for the 100-to-149-seat market, the 100 per cent-new Bombardier CSeries family is powered by Pratt & Whitney PurePower PW1500G geared-turbofan engines.

To date, the CSeries family has two members: the Bombardier CS100, the version which will fly and will be certificated first, optimized to carry from 110 to 129 passengers; and the CS300, which Bombardier intends to fly by late 2013 and certify by the end of 2014.

The CS300 is optimized to carry from 130 to 149 passengers, though it will be able to carry up to 160 in an extra capacity seating (ECS) version featuring two sets of over-wing exits.

According to Bombardier Aerospace, the CSeries family will offer a 15 per cent cash operating cost advantage and a 20 per cent fuel burn advantage compared with existing and new competitors, when operating a 500 nautical-mile sector in the North American operating environment.

For the new ECS option allowing the Bombardier CS300 to seat up to 160 passengers, the CS300’s productivity further improves, offering airlines an average of 4 per cent additional cash operating cost advantage per seat, according to Bombardier.

Bombardier expects the clean-sheet design of the CSeries family to let CS100s and CS300s achieve greatly reduced noise and emissions, as well as superior operational flexibility, exceptional airfield performance and a range of 2,950 nautical miles (5,463 kilometers).

According to Bombardier, the CSeries will be up to 12,000lb (5,443 kilograms) lighter than other aircraft in the same seat category and will provide passengers with a best-in-class, widebody cabin environment in a single-aisle aircraft. Each economy seat row in a CSeries aircraft will have a 2-3 row configuration.