The new Boeing 737-900ER jets, four of which are scheduled for delivery in 2016 and two in 2017, bring Seattle-based Alaska Airlines' total of...

Alaska Airlines has ordered six more Boeing 737-900ER jets, in a deal which Boeing values at $594 million at current list prices.

The new Boeing 737-900ER jets, four of which are scheduled for delivery in 2016 and two in 2017, bring Seattle-based Alaska Airlines’ total of locally manufactured jets on order to 79. All of them will be Boeing 737s: 42 more 737-900ERs and 37 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft.


On February 18, 2015, Alaska Airlines ordered six more Boeing 737-900ERs, increasing its buy of the longest-fuselage 737 model to 65 aircraft and its total orders for Boeing 737-family jets to more than 150 aircraft

On February 18, 2015, Alaska Airlines ordered six more Boeing 737-900ERs, increasing its buy of the longest-fuselage 737 model to 65 aircraft and its total orders for Boeing 737-family jets to more than 150 aircraft

 

“We’re delighted Boeing is able to expedite delivery of four of these new 737-900ERs, increasing the number of planes we’ll receive next year to 19,” says Andrew Harrison, Alaska Airlines executive vice president and chief revenue officer.

Over the next few years, Alaska is replacing its remaining 21 all-passenger Boeing 737-400s with 737-900ERs, which carry 25 per cent more passengers but use approximately the same amount of fuel as the earlier 737 model.

Starting later this year, all of Alaska’s new Boeing 737-900ERs will feature Boeing’s new Space Bins. The larger overhead bins have a similar look and feel to Alaska’s current pivot bins, yet will hold 48 per cent more bags than the current bins, according to Alaska Airlines.

On October 6, 2014, Alaska Airlines ordered another Boeing 737-900ERs to add to its all-Boeing 737 fleet. Boeing said Alaska Airlines intended to use the aircraft both to expand its network replace and to replace some of the previous-generation 737-400s in the airline's fleet

On October 6, 2014, Alaska Airlines ordered another 10 Boeing 737-900ERs to add to its all-Boeing 737 fleet. Boeing said Alaska Airlines intended to use the aircraft both to expand its network replace and to replace some of the previous-generation 737-400s in the airline’s fleet

 

When open, the bin’s bottom edge hangs about 2 inches lower than do the airline’s current pivot bins, which means customers don’t have to lift their bags as high to load them.

The deeper bins allow more bags to be stowed, and let customers load bags with less struggle, according to Alaska Airlines.

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