The first flight-test Rolls-Royce Trent XWB engine has been mounted on the A380 flying test-bed (the aircraft with manufacturer's serial number MSN 001, the...

Airbus has completed installing the first Rolls-Royce Trent XWB flight-test engine on the manufacturer’s A380 flying test-bed aircraft.

Rolls-Royce designed the Trent XWB to power the forthcoming Airbus A350 XWB and to date it is the only engine offered for the new Airbus widebody family.


The engine has been mounted on the A380 flying test-bed (the aircraft with manufacturer’s serial number MSN 001, the first Airbus A380 built) at Airbus’ Jean-Luc Lagardère site in Toulouse.

On October 18, 2011 Airbus completed installing the first Rolls-Royce Trent XWB flight-test engine on its A380 flying testbed (the first A380 built). The Trent XWB is the launch engine for the A350 XWB

Airbus will now prepare the aircraft and engine for the launch of the Trent XWB flight-test campaign, which will begin in the next few weeks.

The Trent XWB engine is the largest Rolls-Royce turbofan, featuring a 118-inch diameter fan.

Versions of Rolls-Royce’s large family of Trent widebody engines also power all of the other widebody models that Airbus is currently producing. The Trent 700 family is offered for the A330-200, A330-300 and A330-200F (along with the Pratt & Whitney PW4168 and the General Electric CF6-80E1, the GE engine being offered only for the A330-200 and the A330-300 but not for the A330-200F).

The Trent XWB is Rolls-Royce's biggest turbofan yet, featuring a 118-inch fan diameter. Is is the launch engine for the Aibus A350 XWB and as of October 2011 was the only engine choice for the new Airbus widebody type

Meanwhile, all A340-500s and A340-600s are powered by the Trent 500 family; and the Trent 900 family is one of two engine choices offered for the Airbus A380, along with the GE-PW Engine Alliance GP7200.

Rolls-Royce Trent engines also power many Boeing 747s, a few 767-300ERs and a number of Boeing 777-200ERs, while the Trent 1000 family is one of two engine choices (along the the General Electric GEnx-1B) for the Boeing 787.

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